This excerpt from one of King's best anti-war speeches is a fierce condemnation of the kind of war we're waging in Iraq right now:

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King was assasinated exactly one year after he delivered this message of peace. The fact that his message describes our current crisis so perfectly is a testament to the prescience of his vision and a dark reminder of how little progress we've made as a nation. Will you answer his call?

We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy, for no document from human hands can make these humans any less our brothers.

Here's the text of the excerpted speech you saw in the video:

A time comes when silence is betrayal. That time has come for us in relation to Vietnam. The truth of these words is beyond doubt, but the mission to which they call us is a most difficult one.

Men do not easily assume the task of opposing their government's policy, especially in time of war. But we must move on.

We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy, for no document from human hands can make these humans any less our brothers.

They must see Americans as strange liberators. Now there is little left to build on -- save bitterness.

What must they think of us in America? How can they trust us? Surely we must understand their feelings even if we do not condone their actions. Surely we must see that the men we supported pressed them to their violence. Surely we must see that our own computerized plans of destruction simply dwarf their greatest acts.

To speak for them is to explain this lack of confidence in Western words, and especially their distrust of American intentions now. Is our nation planning to build on political myth again and then shore it up with the power of new violence?

At this point I should make it clear: I am as deeply concerned about our troops there as anything else. For it occurs to me that we are adding cynicism to the process of death, for they must know after a short period there that none of the things we claim to be fighting for are really involved and the more sophisticated surely realize that we are on the side of the wealthy and the secure while we create hell for the poor.

Somehow this madness must cease. We must stop now. I speak for the poor of America who are paying the double price of smashed hopes at home and death and corruption in Vietnam. I speak as a citizen of the world, for the world as it stands aghast at the path we have taken.

I speak as one who loves America to the leaders of our own nation. The great initiative in this war is ours. The initiative to stop it must be ours.

A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.

Now let us begin. Now let us rededicate ourselves to the long and bitter -- but beautiful -- struggle for a new world.

The choice is ours, if we will but make the right choice, we will be able to speed up the day, all over America and all over the world, when justice will down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream.

Excerpts from "Beyond Vietnam" speech delivered April 4, 1967 at a meeting of Clergy and Laity Concerned at Riverside Church in New York City

See and hear full speech at The American Rhetoric.